In October We Wear Pink

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

In+October+We+Wear+Pink

Oct. 1 marked the beginning of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, an annual, national campaign that was established to increase awareness about the disease. During the month of October, as a way to offer support to those undergoing treatment for breast cancer and to honor those that have lost the battle, the local community gets a pink makeover. Pink is the color for breast cancer and a symbol of empowerment and hope.

Every October, the community comes together to raise awareness for breast cancer and to encourage women to be pro-active with their own health.

Image comes from the National Breast Cancer Awareness Foundation

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women and statistics show that every 1 in 8 women in America (12%) will receive a Breast Cancer diagnosis in their lifetime (CDC). In 2020 alone, according to the American Cancer Society, it is expected that about 276,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed.

When it comes to breast cancer, early detection can drastically change a person’s prognosis and make the disease easier to treat; however, many women with breast cancer have no symptoms. This is why regular exams are so crucial.

Per the American Cancer Society’s guidelines, it is recommended that women who are at average risk, meaning that they don’t have a history of breast cancer, a family history of breast cancer, or the BRCA gene, and have not had chest radiation therapy before age 30, should partake in yearly mammograms beginning at age 40. Women should also be aware of their own bodies and do regular breast self-exams to look for any abnormal lumps that may have formed.

You can find more statistics and other important educational information about breast cancer here.

The support from the community when it comes to breast cancer awareness is immense. Local businesses, hospitals, and schools all come together with the same goal of educating the community and raising awareness for breast cancer. Events are a little different this year because of COVID-19, but local organizations are still making sure to do their part while also adhering to health guidelines.

Every year, Southern Ohio Medical Center comes up with an initiative to get the community involved and raise awareness for breast cancer: this year their campaign was called “Cruisin’ Pink.” Throughout October, SOMC will be selling t-shirts with all of the proceeds going to benefit the SOMC Cancer Compassion Fund; a fund that is intended to help those going through chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. King’s Daughters Medical Center is also selling t-shirts and the proceeds will be directed towards providing mammograms and other services to uninsured/under-insured women in the local and surrounding communities.

While October will come to an end and all of the pink decorations will be put away and the events will come to a stop, the battle against breast cancer never ceases. It is urgent that women remain pro-active in their health all year round and continue to get their yearly mammograms.